Wednesday, May 24, 2017

The burial at sea of Osama bin Laden after he was killed by Navy SEALs last year followed traditional Islamic procedures, according to newly released military e-mails, but less than a dozen "leadership" members aboard the Navy carrier where the service took place were informed of ..


Dawood Ibrahim did attend the marriage of his daughter Mahrukh with Junaid, son of former Pakistani cricketer Javed Miandad. ... Top intelligence sources say Dawood travelled to Saudi Arabia for the marriage on a Pakistan passport. ... Then how did he manage to reach the ...


The 1993 Bombay bombings were a series of 12 bomb explosions that took place in Bombay, India on 12 March 1993. The coordinated attacks, carried out in revenge for riots that killed many Muslims, were the most destructive bomb explosions in Indian history. This was first of its kind serial-bomb-blasts across the world.


The 2012 Delhi gang rape case involved a rape and fatal assault that occurred on 16 December 2012 in Munirka, a neighbourhood in South Delhi. The incident took place when a 23-year-old female physiotherapy intern, Jyoti Singh,[4] was beaten, gang raped, and tortured in a private bus in which she was traveling with her friend, Awindra Pratap Pandey. There were six others in the bus, including the driver, all of whom raped the woman and beat her friend. Eleven days after the assault, she was transferred to a hospital in Singapore for emergency treatment, but died from her injuries two days later.[5][6] The incident generated widespread national and international coverage and was widely condemned, both in India and abroad. Subsequently, public protests against the state and central governments for failing to provide adequate security for women took place in New Delhi, where thousands of protesters clashed with security forces. Similar protests took place in major cities throughout the country. Since there is a law in India that does not allow the press to publicise a rape victim's name, the victim has become widely known as Nirbhaya, meaning "fearless", and her life and death have come to symbolise women's struggle to end the rape culture in India and the long-held practice of either denial of its existence within the country,[7] or otherwise blaming the victim rather than the perpetrator. All the accused were arrested and charged with sexual assault and murder. One of the accused, Ram Singh, died in police custody from possible suicide on 11 March 2013 in the Tihar Jail.[8] According to some published reports, the police say Ram Singh hanged himself, but defense lawyers and his family suspect he was murdered.[9] The rest of the accused went on trial in a fast-track court; the prosecution finished presenting its evidence on 8 July 2013.[10] The juvenile was convicted of rape and murder and given the maximum sentence of three years' imprisonment in a reform facility.[11] On 10 September 2013, the four remaining adult defendants were found guilty of rape and murder and three days later were sentenced to death by hanging.[12][13][14] On 13 March 2014, Delhi High Court in the death reference case and hearing appeals against the conviction by the lower Court, upheld the guilty verdict and the death sentences.[15] As a result of the protests, in December 2012, a judicial committee was set up to study and take public suggestions for the best ways to amend laws to provide quicker investigation and prosecution of sex offenders. After considering about 80,000 suggestions, the committee submitted a report which indicated that failures on the part of the government and police were the root cause behind crimes against women. In 2013, the Criminal Law (Amendment) Ordinance, 2013 was promulgated by President Pranab Mukherjee, several new laws were passed, and six new fast-track courts were created to hear rape cases. Critics argue that the legal system remains slow to hear and prosecute rape cases, but most agree that the case has resulted in a tremendous increase in the public discussion of crimes against women and statistics show that there has been an improvement in the number of women willing to file a crime report. However, in December 2014, the two-year anniversary of the attack, the girl's father called the promises of reform unmet and said that he felt regret in that he had not been able to bring justice for his daughter and other women like her.[16] A BBC documentary titled India's Daughter based on the attack was broadcast in the UK on 4 March 2015.[17] Indian-Canadian filmmaker Deepa Mehta's 2016 film Anatomy of Violence was also based on the incident, exploring the social conditions and values in Indian society that made it possible.


The film begins with SP Amit Kumar (Ajay Devgan) taking charge of the Tezpur District (fictitious) in Bihar. The area is notorious for its crime rate, with Tezpur Police under the control of the local don Sadhu Yadav (Mohan Joshi) and his son Sundar Yadav (Yashpal Sharma). Amit tries to instill honesty and courage in his subordinates, but in vain. Bacha Yadav (Mukesh Tiwari), who is a stooge of Sadhu Yadav visits his hideout, sees an infamous local goon Nunwa taking shelter there. Fearing that arresting him would open the lid on the nexus between Nunwa and the Tezpur Police, he kills Nunwa and misleads Police that he was killed in an encounter. Suspicious about the encounter, Amit Kumar summons Bacha Yadav, puts him off duty temporarily and also tries to keep him away from Sadhu Yadav and Sundar Yadav. Anxious that he would be transferred from Tezpur, Bacha Yadav, seeking the help of Sadhu Yadav, visits his home, where he finds out that he is being ditched by Sadhu and vows to settle score with them. Meanwhile, Sundar manhandles a Public Works Department engineer for not heeding to his word during a tendering process. Amit takes notice of the incident and also finds that a girl is missing from her home after being kidnapped by Sundar. Sensing an opportunity, Bacha Yadav urges Amit to give him one more chance, who obliges him. Bacha Yadav tricks Sundar into a factory where Amit and his men are waiting and after a brief scuffle, Sundar is arrested and produced in a local court, where the judge acquits Sundar on the account of lack of evidence against him. Sadhu Yadav's men then try to vandalise a shop of local pan vendor after he testified against Sundar, before being arrested and jailed in the police station. There, a fight arises between the accused and Bacha Yadav and his colleagues. It reaches an extreme point with Bacha Yadav piercing the eyes of the accused and pouring acid, referred locally as "Gangaajal", on their eyes. The incident raises a hue and cry in the local media, which accuses Police of vigilante justice. Angered by the incident, Amit Kumar orders his men involved to give their confessions in writing. While all, except Bacha Yadav, deny their involvement, Bacha Yadav writes his confession in a letter and submits it to Amit. When Bacha Yadav reaches his home, he finds his son and wife taken hostage by Sundar Yadav who, after a brief struggle, kills Bacha Yadav by shooting in his eyes. Enraged by the incident, Amit Kumar burns the confession letter of Bacha Yadav and issues a search warrant for Sundar and warns Sadhu Yadav to tell Sundar to surrender himself. Sadhu Yadav applies for an anticipatory bail for Sundar but before Sundar is produced in the court, he is arrested and is taken to jail. This time, the court rejects the bail application and orders the Police to keep Sundar in a 10-day custody. However, Sadhu Yadav influences local home minister and the Deputy Inspector General of Police (DIG) (Mohan Agashe) of the area, Verma, to release his son and also to send Amit on an emergency leave. After being released, Sundar disrupts the marriage of the girl who he kidnapped earlier and kills her mother in the process. Unable to bear the loss of her mother and the torture at the hands of Sundar, she kills herself in the presence of Amit. Amit detains both Sadhu and Sundar and tries to take them to Police Station. However, locals stop Amit and demand that both be killed then and there itself, before being convinced by him that they would be tried as per the law. On the way to Police Station, however, both Sadhu and Sundar escape. Amit then catches up with them and brief fight takes place between them and the film ends with both Sundar and Sadhu getting killed by falling accidentally on chisels of a plough, which incidentally pierce through their eyes.


Damini – Lightning is a 1993 crime thriller film directed by Rajkumar Santoshi starring Meenakshi Sheshadri in the title role alongside Sunny Deol, Rishi Kapoor, Amrish Puri, Tinu Anand, Paresh Rawal in pivotal role and Aamir Khan as special appearance. The story is of how a woman fights against society for justice.


Gangaajal (Devnagari: गंगा-जल English: Ganges' Waters or literally means Holy Waters) is a 2003 Bollywood crime film directed by Prakash Jha, starring Ajay Devgan, Gracy Singh and Mukesh Tiwari. The movie as a sidetrack also mentions the blinding incident at Bhagalpur. Gangaajal was a hit at the Indian box-office.